Tag Archives: Technology

Living in the New World: The Impact of Technology and Globalization

by: Patrick Fernandez ’20

Last October 30th, Fordham IPED and Touro College sponsored a conference entitled “Living in the New World: The Impact of Technology & Globalization” which featured academics from different fields discussing how social institutions and processes are changing because of technology and globalization.

The conference started with an address from Dr. Peter Stace, Fordham’s Senior Vice President for Enrollment and Strategy, and from Dr. Marian Stoltz-Loike, Touro’s Dean of the Lander College for Women and Vice President for Online Education.

Dr. Peter Stace giving his welcome address in behalf of Fordham University

Dr. Marian Stoltz-Loike giving her welcome address in behalf of Touro College

A discussion between Fordham IPED’s Prof. Schwalbenberg and Touro’s Prof. Weinstock then followed. They discussed how the world is responding, and how it has changed due to the rapid development of technology and globalization. They highlighted how technology has produced a lot of good but also a lot of uncertainty about some of its effects going forward.

Prof. Schwalbenberg and Prof. Weinstock discussing

A panel discussion then followed about how social institutions are changing in terms of politics, economics, the family, and spirituality. The panelists were Prof. Bastiaens of Fordham’s Department of Political Science, Prof. Rengifo of Fordham’s Department of Economics, Prof. Weinshenker of Fordham’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and Prof. Ratti of Touro’s Department of Sociology.

(L-R) Prof. Ratti, Prof. Ratti, Prof. Bastiaens, and Prof. Weinshenker discussing how social institutions are changing

The afternoon session of the conference was held at Touro College where lunch was also served. The first afternoon session featured Touro’s Rabbi Prof. Fishbane and Rev. Fr. Patrick Ryan, SJ on “Old and New Meanings of Community – for the Jewish People and the Catholic Church.” They discussed how the very definition of community have shifted due to the increasing globalization of the world, and the rapid development of technology which have brought people closer than ever before. They discussed how the social climate has changed, as well as its repercussions for the Jewish People and for the Catholic Church.

The second panel then followed which discussed how social processes are changing as seen in our psychology, and sociology. The panelists were Prof. Pirutinsky of Touro’s Graduate School of Social Work, Mr. Rosenberg of Haaretz, Prof. Silberman of Touro’s Departments of Sociology and Pyschology, and Prof Leventis of Touro’s Department of Sociology and Academic Director of the Program in Criminal Justice.

After a coffee break, Prof. Verbit closed the conference with a discussion on how society has indeed changed due to technology and globalization, and what is to be done moving forward. Prof. Verbit also discussed how technology and globalization, with all of its benefit, cannot be the ultimate cure to the problems of the world – thus requiring more action and thought from society as we move forward.

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Carlos Baeta ’18 at United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Office

By: Carlos Baeta ’18

During the Spring 2018 semester, I interned at the United Nation’s Department of Social Affairs within the E-Government division. During my internship, I was under the supervision of IPED alumnus and former Matteo Ricci scholar Deniz Susar ’08.

As an intern, my tasks included data analysis, research and report writing relating to some key deliverables within the office. The most salient project I worked on was the 2018 E-government survey, which will be published later this year. The E-government survey is important insofar as it highlights the importance of a government’s ability to leverage existing technologies to provide key services to their constituencies. Put differently, it analyzes how governments in the UN’s 193 member states use Information and Communication Technologies (ICT’s) to ensure sustainable development.

To this extent, it would be remiss of me not to mention how important IPED was in ensuring that I was able to maximize my experience at the United Nations. Firstly, the research methodology and analysis that I conducted on the E-government survey was similar to Dr. Schwalbenberg’s Foreign Aid and Development class. Given this, my experience working on the Fordham Francis Index (FFI) allowed me to understand the E-Government Development Index and its component parts from day one. Secondly, the Applied Econometrics class and my background in management consulting assisted in analyzing and presenting the data in creative ways. Finally, I believe that the extensive writing courses that we took as well as the robust feedback that we get from the professors improved my research and writing ability respectively.

In conclusion, I would recommend current and future IPED students to leverage Fordham’s proximity to the UN as a means of getting international experience that complements the coursework. Furthermore, I believe it prudent to use the IPED directory and alumni networks during the application process. Finally, it is important to acknowledge that IPED provides all of its students with the tools necessary for becoming economic researchers or public servants after graduation. The UNDESA is an opportunity that I would highly recommend to compliment your academic experience.

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An Ethical Compass for the Digital Age

March 15th-17th, 2018, Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice (CAPP) Foundation and Fordham University co-sponsored a conference with the theme “An Ethical Compass for the Digital Age”. The goal of the conference was to define, in practical terms, the role of ethics and Catholic Social Teaching in today’s economy. Business and professional leaders gathered together with academic economists and experts on Catholic Social Teaching to discuss the topic in depth. They discussed the role of data, communication in media, and a responsibility to the common good. The conference ended with the presentation of a draft framework on how the Church can respond to ethical issues of the digital age, with a focus on consumer ownership of data, possible regulations, and conversations around digital ethics. The results of this conference can prompt conversation and action within Catholic populations throughout the world.

  

    

 

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