Tag Archives: Holy See

Vatican Dinner: 2017 Fordham University Pope Francis Global Poverty Index Research

Photo Credits: Thomas Stoelker

Dr. Schwalbenberg welcomes His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher, Secretary for Relations with States and Head of the Holy See’s Delegation to the Opening of the 72nd UN General Assembly.

Last Monday, IPED students participated in the CAPP/Fordham Dinner to welcome His Excellency Archbishop Gallagher, Head of the Holy See’s delegation to the Opening of the 72nd UN General Assembly. Notable guests to the event were His Eminence, Theodore Cardinal McCarric, Archbishop Emeritus of Washington, Dr. Frederick Fakharzadeh M.D., President of the Fondazione Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice – USA, Reverend Fr. Joseph M. McShane, S.J., President of Fordham University, and Professor Henry Schwalbenberg, Ph.D., Director of the IPED Program.

His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher and Father McShane

The dinner was an opportunity for students to present the results of the research we conducted for the 2017 Fordham University Pope Francis Global Poverty Index which is a simple yet broad measure of poverty and wellbeing. The index highlights seven primary indicators which are categorized into two main categories – material wellbeing and spiritual wellbeing. This study intends to help decision-makers identify countries most in need of aid as well as the area of development in which aid is most expected to make an impact. A copy of the results can be obtained through the IPED program’s office at the campus in Rosehill.

His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher

Donna Odra and Archbishop Gallagher as he is given his copy of the Pope Francis Poverty Index

Furthermore, we were also able to listen to Archbishop Gallagher’s address on the Holy See’s perspective on Contemporary International Issues. In his address, he emphasizes on the necessity of upholding the equal dignity of all human beings prior to any political or cultural construct, with all its consequences for the life of society. The Holy See is pursuing this goal through its efforts to prioritize and promote peace around the world despite the increased conflict and tension in different regions. He reiterates the Holy See’s encouragement of the International Community to choose peacemaking over warmongering and that dialogue has always been more fruitful than violence.

Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Observer of the Holy See Mission to the UN, speaks at the Vatican Dinner

His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher speaks at the Vatican Dinner

The archbishop entertained questions from the guests after his address. Dinner concluded with socials allowing guests and students to share thoughts and ideas on the current challenges we are facing in the international arena.

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Student Spotlight: Maggie Hutchison at the Holy See Mission to the United Nations

Margaret “Maggie” Hutchison (IPED ‘18) is an intern with The Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations at the United Nations headquarters in New York City. The Holy See is the political entity of the Vatican and is an “Observer State” to the United Nations, which means they do not have voting privileges, but they can still make interventions and participate in debates.

United Nations Headquarters

Maggie’s work as an intern involves covering issues of migration and other topics that the Nuncio and Monsignors find important to the Mission. In these meetings she is engaged in taking detailed notes that are later compiled into a report that is eventually sent to Rome for the Vatican Holy See officials read.

Maggie standing in the General Assembly

Maggie spoke about the advantages of working the Holy See at the UN: “During my time as an intern, I have been able to take advantage of many UN opportunities such as evening events and language classes. These activities have improved my learning outside of the classroom and I am grateful for the experience.“

Maggie was introduced to this internship through Dr. Schwalbenberg, Director or the IPED Program, as part of her fellowship to the program, however she mentioned that her fellow interns at the Mission found the internship through reaching out, making connections with someone in the Mission and passing along their resume. She says, “It is wonderful UN experience and allows you to understand the system better and to make strong connections.”

Maggie out in front the General Assembly at the UN

Maggie is a full time student in the IPED program while she carries out her internship duties at the Holy See Mission.

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The Holy See And The Fight Against Human Trafficking: Falling Prey

On February 23, 2017, the US branch of the Vatican Foundation Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice and Fordham University co-sponsored the inaugural lecture of the Cassamarca Foundation Chair in Migration and Globalization, titled: “The Holy See and the Fight Against Human Trafficking.” The conference examined the realities of human trafficking today, what is being done, and what opportunities there are going forward. 

The audience listening to Archbishop Auza’s lecture

Falling Prey: Human traffickers set their sights on refugees

In 2015, nearly 250 million people moved across international borders. Of these, over 60 million people moved as a result of war (i.e. forced migration), and many of these asylum seekers are being targeted by traffickers.

“Human Trafficking has found an advantageous environment in which to work. Refugees are willing to take any risk. They are vulnerable.” said Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Pope Francis’ Representative to the United Nations.

On February 23rd, Fordham University’s graduate program in International Political Economy and Development (IPED) hosted a Consultation on Human Trafficking at which Archbishop Auza served as the event’s keynote speaker. “How many persons are victims of human trafficking?” he asks. “The honest answer is that the number is staggering, and nobody really knows!”

Archbishop Bernardito Auza
Apostolic Nuncio, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the
United Nations

Although there can be no definite numbers, the Archbishop shared estimates from a well-cited 2012 study by the International Labour Organization (ILO) that there are “about 21 million men, women and children who are trafficked, sold, coerced or subjected to conditions of slavery in various forms and in various sectors.” These figures continue to grow, especially in recent years, and as millions of refugees flee their homes, human traffickers are capitalizing on the opportunity.

“The flood of trafficking victims has multiple tributaries”, said Archbishop Auza, who shared that Pope Francis identifies four different causes to be economic, environmental, political, and ethical.

The Archbishop then offered two brief points for reflection: “First, the importance of a faith actively manifested in deeds. Pope Francis wants those who are religious to find in their faith the deepest motivation for leadership and involvement in this fight.”

“Second, deeds sustained by the hope that, together, we shall overcome.” As an example of overcoming such a colossal crime against human dignity, Archbishop Auza made reference to the historical politician and philanthropist, William Wilberforce, who was a leader of the movement to eradicate the slave trade in Britain.

“It took William Wilberforce only 20 years to end the British slave trade and only 30 more to abolish the slave trade across the globe, at a time when slavery was as accepted as natural as birth, marriage and death.”

Human trafficking must never be accepted. It is “a crime that’s occurring in our own backyards, it’s under our noses, and we cannot ignore it” said Archbishop Auza. He then went on to quote Pope Francis: “We must raise awareness of this new evil which, in the world at large, wants to be hidden since it is scandalous and ‘politically incorrect’.”

The Archbishop then concluded his remarks by exhorting the audience: “Let us bring that Wilberforce in each of us to bear in our fight against human trafficking and others forms of modern slavery.”

A written summary of the presentations and discussions from the Consultation on Human Trafficking will be sent to Rome as input for an international conference on human trafficking, to be held at the Vatican on May 18-20. For a full transcript of Archbishop Bernardito Auza’s speech at Fordham University, click here.

 

Written by: Owen Fitzgerald

Owen is a first-year student in Fordham University’s Graduate Program in International Political Economy & Development.

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