Gurpreet Singh ’19 at Chhaya CDC

Gurpreet Singh ’19 currently works at Chhaya CDC in Queens NY. Chhaya CDC is a local non-profit organization that advocates for the housing and economic development needs of New York City’s South Asian community. It’s mission is to work with New Yorkers of South Asian origin to advocate for and build economically stable, sustainable, and thriving communities. Gurpreet works alongside IPED alumnus William Spisak ’13.

Gurpreet leads Chhaya’s Asset Building program to target South Asian immigrants and other marginalized communities in New York City to promote economic independence and financial stability, as well as contribute to the organization’s programmatic vision, and growth for the community. Gurpreet runs the organization’s Peer Lending Circle, a microfinance program that helps new immigrants establish credit and savings in the United States. In addition to the lending circle, Gurpreet coordinates Chhaya’s English classes and assists in its emerging small business initiative, where the goal is to preserve small businesses in New York City.

Gurpreet is a lifelong resident of New York City and is excited to continue his education at Fordham. He is Matteo Ricci fellow and is expected to graduate in the summer of 2019.

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International Project: The Value of Human Rights on the Camino de Santiago

By: Robyn Emory Murray ’18

The Fordham delegation leaving on their first day of the Camino

Last month, three IPED students were invited to join the International Project on “The Value of Human Rights on the Camino de Santiago: Harnessing the power of tourism to promote cross-cultural dialogue and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals” in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Benjamin Boltz (IPED ’19), Owen Fitzgerald (IPED ’18), Robyn Emory Murray (IPED ’18), and Evan Soloman (M.A., Ethics and Society), were chosen by Dr. Melissa Labonte to participate in the program, which consisted of three phases: online learning modules, walking the Camino de Santiago, and the concluding forum.

IPED students with Provost Freedman

The focus of the program, organized by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), Helsinki España University Network, and the Compostela Group of Universities, was to reflect on human rights, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the value of tourism in achieving those goals. “Walking the Camino was incredible. The idea that people had been walking to Santiago de Compostela for hundreds of years along the routes that we were taking created this tangible connection with history and, for me, Christianity what I had never experienced before.” – Robyn Emory Murray

Owen, Evan, Robyn, and Axelle (KU Leuven) arrive in Santiago de Compostela

Student Owen Fitzgerald ’18 reflects: “Ultimately, this initiative helped me to garner broader knowledge of these rights that are intrinsic to all human beings and to gain a deeper understanding of the impact cross-cultural dialogue can have, especially in the context of tourism. For me, each of the 81 miles hiked served as an opportunity to reflect on these topics with other impassioned students – together on the same journey toward ensuring a more free and peaceful world.”

Countryside in Galicia, Spain

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Enrico La Viña ’19 Presented Research in Chicago

By: Enrico Antonio La Viña ’19

On 6 April 2018, I presented a poster on my research entitled “­­The Varieties of Populism in Southeast Asia: Comparing the Electoral Victories of Duterte and Widodo” at the annual Midwestern Political Science Association (MPSA) conference in Chicago. MPSA is a four-day academic conference, and it is one of the largest political science conferences in the world. The poster presentation was based on a paper that I wrote for my Comparative Political Analysis class under Dr. Ida Bastiaens.

Enrico presented his research on Southeast Asian Populism.

In my paper, I account for the differences in the populist practices of Joko Widodo of Indonesia and Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines. I argue that the level of confidence that voters have in the established democratic system is linked with the kind of populism that will emerge. An anti -establishment populist such as Duterte is more likely to succeed if citizens have become disillusioned with the system. Conversely, a relatively reformist populist such as Widodo is more likely to be elected if there is enough trust in the system. This paper addresses two gaps in the literature on populism. First, the populists of Asia do not neatly fit into the right-wing/left-wing populist typology. Second, most often cited explanations for populism– socio-economic inequality and cultural backlash– do not explain the variation in campaign promises regarding a revolt or reform of the system.

Enrico presented at the 76th Annual MPSA Conference.

This conference contributed in three ways to my professional development. First, I hope to eventually publish this study in an academic journal. The feedback I received will be of immense value as I prepare this study for publication. Second, I observed and interacted with prominent political scientists from around the world. I was therefore able to attend insightful presentations, understand recent developments in the field, and expand my network. Lastly, the experience of preparing for and delivering a presentation at a high-level conference will be invaluable in the future.

Attending this conference so early on in my academic career will certainly pay dividends in the long-run. I was honored to represent the FordhamInternational Political Economy and Development Program in the conference.

Enrico stands with the poster he presented in Chicago.

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Wesley Milillo ’18 at Global Investment Bank, Societe Generale

By: Wesley Milillo ’18

I currently work in Prime Services at Societe Generale. Societe Generale is a French-based, global investment bank with branches and offices around the world. Prime Services is a division within Global Markets that helps clients borrow, sell, and trade financial products. Clients ranging from hedge funds, to other banks, to mutual funds, seek to engage in execution services—i.e. trading, as well as clearing and settling which consists of updating and reconciling the accounts between two parties. Prime Services helps them to do this efficiently.

IPED student Wesley Milillo ’19 works at Societe Generale.

At Society Generale, I am a Transition Manager. Transition Management is a consultative, project-management team that helps clients come into the bank and do business with us. After a Salesperson ‘makes the sale,’ and the client agrees to terms and prices, there is still a lot that goes into getting the client up and running. There is a lot of documentation that is involved, ‘Know Your Customer’ (KYC) procedures to ensure our clients have compliant backgrounds, Credit terms negotiation, customer due diligence, and technology and reporting set ups. I work with our clients to help them through all these processes with our internal teams, and get the client “live” and trading in a timely manner. Through this, we help build long-term partnerships with our clients and ensure that all necessary checks and balances necessary for a good relationship are in place.

Being an IPED student has helped me to see the big picture with respect to the much internationalized financial services sector. Aside from the holistic international economics courses I’ve taken, I’ve also taken some coding classes as well as data and modeling courses as well. Having a background in data and quantitative skills are highly regarded in the financial services sector, so having learned this while working has allowed me to better contribute my skills on a daily basis.

Societe Generale is the global investment bank where Wesley works.

As a student in IPED, I am much more exposed to others who also have a background in developing countries. Hearing their perspectives, and learning about the interactions between both the political realm and economic realm, helped me to understand not only the developing world more clearly, but also our economy and background. Gaining an understanding of global capital flows and markets has given me a much deeper appreciation for our global economy and has helped me better contextualize our place in it.

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Career Trips: Council on Foreign Relations

IPED students at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Last Friday, April 6th, Fordham IPED students participated in the Model Diplomacy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). The Model Diplomacy program is adaptable to short and long term simulations, with material on 14 politically debated topics. They offer students research materials and multimedia content to build students’ wholistic understanding of the topic of interest.

IPED students participate in the CFR Model Diplomacy program.

Twenty IPED students simulated a National Security Council (NSC) debate on Global Climate Change Policy. Each student represented a different role, from President of the United States, to Secretary of Defense, to Permanent Representative to the UN. In recognizing the importance of environmental stewardship and its social, economic, and political implications, the group made a collective recommendation to renegotiate our national commitments to the Paris Agreement.

By: Sarah Garwood ’19

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