Category Archives: Community & Culture

Armand Aquino ’17 with Catholic Relief Services in Senegal

By: Armand Aquino ’17

Armand inside Phare des Mamelles, the highest point in Dakar and the second most important lighthouse in Africa, after Cape Town’s lighthouse.

Last May 9-12, I participated in Catholic Relief Services’ (CRS) first ProPack I training in French in Dakar, Senegal. ProPack I (or Project Package I) is one of CRS’ manuals on project design for CRS project and program managers. The training gathered more than 30 CRS staff from the West Africa and Central Africa country offices including Burkina Faso (where I currently serve as a Fordham Intern), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Mali, Niger, Rwanda, and Senegal, among others.

Fresh off the press. Armand with the French copy of CRS’ ProPack I.

I first came across CRS’ ProPack I in Dr. Schwalbenberg’s Project Design class where I learned the basic concepts of project design including problem tree analysis and the logical frameworks. The training, however, had more concepts added and it made these concepts more “practical” because they fall in a specific process of project design that CRS staff ought to follow. The process of project design itself was the most useful take-away for me, since I tend to jump from one step to another, when in fact, there is a logical flow that could make the work easier. For instance, when given an issue or problem, I tend to start with a problem tree analysis to identify the causes of the problem. However, conceptual frameworks can already do that for you since it has already made the connections between factors and the problem. What one can do then is to use these conceptual frameworks to specify the causes (scope, gravity, etc.) through research and assessment that will then help make the problem tree more “meaty” and easily convertible to a tangible results framework for the project.

ProPack I training in Dakar, Senegal where CRS staff gathered to learn and share experiences in project design.

In addition to the content, the facilitation of the training which used real-life examples and the opportunity to hear from the experience of various CRS staff in project design were enriching; it made the concepts more real and easier to understand. The training was also a great opportunity to continue practicing my French language skills since everything, including lectures, readings, and group work, was conducted in French and to network with some CRS staff in the region. I must admit I had a little difficulty in following some parts of the discussion since I am not yet fluent in the language. But what really helped me prepare for the training was reading the English version of ProPack I in advance so I have the concepts at the back of my head and I do the translation and connection in French as the training goes. Additionally, it was definitely helpful to have some experience in project design that I could bank on during the training (As an intern, I am involved in a couple of project design initiatives for the Burkina Faso country program).

Armand inside Phare des Mamelles, the highest point in Dakar and the second most important lighthouse in Africa, after Cape Town’s lighthouse.

Given the adventurer in me, I also used this opportunity to visit some superlative places in Dakar and get immersed for a bit in its history and culture. I visited the highest point in Dakar and the furthest West tip of the African continent.

When one is in Dakar, one should not miss Île de Gorée, a colorful island with a very dark history because of the slave trade.

I would like to thank CRS West Africa Regional Office and Burkina Faso Country Office for allowing me to participate in the training and Fordham IPED for financing my participation in the training. The training was definitely a good investment as I continue to explore a long-term career in the international development space.

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Summer Series: Angeli Diamante ’18 and the LISA Award

By: Angeli Diamante

Angeli with Cristo de la Concordia. This statue is taller than the Christ the Redeemer statue in Brazil!

I was awarded a Language Immersion Study Award (LISA) fellowship to study Spanish in Bolivia. With Spanish being one of the most widely spoken languages in the world, learning this language will be an asset in my future career. Living in Cochabamba, Bolivia was different from life in New York City. Life moved at a slower and relaxed pace. And the food was wonderful – I definitely recommend eating their salteñas.

Angeli with the guide in Pico Tunari.

Choosing the Maryknoll language learning program was a great choice. The personalized instruction from the professors helped me become better in my weak areas. It was not only language they imparted. Every week we had an hour-long conference where we learned more about the culture and the state of Bolivia. We also had cultural trips which made me appreciate the country beyond its language and tourist spots.

I had the wonderful opportunity to stay with a very hospitable host family who took great care of me during the entire 6 weeks in Cochabamba. Being surrounded by non-English speakers definitely forced me to improve my communication skills in Spanish.

Angeli with her host family.

LISA is a great opportunity and I urge students to apply for it if they can. Not only do you learn a new language, you experience a different culture as well.

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Filed under Community & Culture, Prestigious Awards, Trips

IPED Thanksgiving!

By: Sarah Garwood

Before heading off for Thanksgiving break, our IPED family came together to celebrate and feast! We gathered in gratitude–for this program, this cohort, the opportunities before us, our families, our health. Our potluck feast included a big turkey and lots of dishes and desserts. We ate traditional thanksgiving foods and some special international flavors too! May you and your loved ones enjoy a happy, healthy, and filling Thanksgiving!

  

  

    

   

 

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IPED/Economics 5K

By: Sarah Garwood

Congratulations to all the 5k participants!

This weekend, we hosted our first ever IPED/Economics 5K run! Students, faculty and members of the community participated. IPED student, James Duke, came in first place followed by Alumni Dissertation Fellow Katie Jajtner.

  

 

After the race, runners, race marshals, and spectators joined together for a brunch and raffle. Prizes were donated by local restaurants and businesses in the area including: Marie’s Roasted Coffee Beans and Gifts, Cerini Coffee and Gifts, Randazzo’s Seafood, Zero OHO Nove, San Gennaro Restaurant, Robert’ Restaurant, and Enzo’s of Arthur Ave. One lucky winner also received an IPED Loot Bag featuring the new IPED wine glass and coveted IPED coffee mug. Congratulations to our winners across both the Departments of Economics and IPED: Greg Fischer, Amr Yawer, Anjali Chandra, Sarah Garwood, Tess Hart, and Moses Cam! Together, we raised $381 for Hurricane Harvey relief.

Our gold and silver medalists!

Brunch in the IPED Commons

Sunny and Chris drawing names for the raffle

James Duke claiming his prize

A huge thank you to Ms. Donna Orda, Tess Hart ’18, and Ms. Katie Jajtner for the time and energy they put into making this event a success!

IPED and Economics graduate students celebrating together

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Vatican Dinner: 2017 Fordham University Pope Francis Global Poverty Index Research

Photo Credits: Thomas Stoelker

Dr. Schwalbenberg welcomes His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher, Secretary for Relations with States and Head of the Holy See’s Delegation to the Opening of the 72nd UN General Assembly.

Last Monday, IPED students participated in the CAPP/Fordham Dinner to welcome His Excellency Archbishop Gallagher, Head of the Holy See’s delegation to the Opening of the 72nd UN General Assembly. Notable guests to the event were His Eminence, Theodore Cardinal McCarric, Archbishop Emeritus of Washington, Dr. Frederick Fakharzadeh M.D., President of the Fondazione Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice – USA, Reverend Fr. Joseph M. McShane, S.J., President of Fordham University, and Professor Henry Schwalbenberg, Ph.D., Director of the IPED Program.

His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher and Father McShane

The dinner was an opportunity for students to present the results of the research we conducted for the 2017 Fordham University Pope Francis Global Poverty Index which is a simple yet broad measure of poverty and wellbeing. The index highlights seven primary indicators which are categorized into two main categories – material wellbeing and spiritual wellbeing. This study intends to help decision-makers identify countries most in need of aid as well as the area of development in which aid is most expected to make an impact. A copy of the results can be obtained through the IPED program’s office at the campus in Rosehill.

His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher

Donna Odra and Archbishop Gallagher as he is given his copy of the Pope Francis Poverty Index

Furthermore, we were also able to listen to Archbishop Gallagher’s address on the Holy See’s perspective on Contemporary International Issues. In his address, he emphasizes on the necessity of upholding the equal dignity of all human beings prior to any political or cultural construct, with all its consequences for the life of society. The Holy See is pursuing this goal through its efforts to prioritize and promote peace around the world despite the increased conflict and tension in different regions. He reiterates the Holy See’s encouragement of the International Community to choose peacemaking over warmongering and that dialogue has always been more fruitful than violence.

Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Observer of the Holy See Mission to the UN, speaks at the Vatican Dinner

His Excellency Archbishop Paul Ricard Gallagher speaks at the Vatican Dinner

The archbishop entertained questions from the guests after his address. Dinner concluded with socials allowing guests and students to share thoughts and ideas on the current challenges we are facing in the international arena.

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